Articles Posted in Single Person Planning

5.7.19A single parent wonders if they need a will, or if just making an account a Payable on Death or POD account will be an adequate solution for transferring his assets when he dies.

Even if you have only one child, if you have no will, things will be complicated for her or him. You may wonder if you can simplify matters, just by creating a POD account with their name as the person to inherit the account when you die. However, what if you have other property, like a car, a tax or credit card refund, or any other asset that is not part of that account? Yes, that property will pass to the sole child by intestacy. However, having a will could make it far easier for your child.

nj.com’s recent article asks “Do I really need a will to help my son when I die?” The article explains that by naming your only child as the beneficiary on a POD or Transfer on Death (TOD) account, that move only governs the transfer of that particular account at your death.

6.12.19Estate planning requires making some of the most important decisions a parent can make for their child’s well-being.

Single parents need to plan in advance for what will happen to their children, whether they are minors or adults. That includes preparing for the parent’s incapacity, as much as it does for their passing.

Talk to a qualified estate planning attorney and let him or her know your overall perspective about your children, and what you see as their capabilities and limitations. This information can frequently determine whether you restrict their access to funds and how long those limitations should be in place, in the event you’re no longer around.

9.27.18Without the security of a spouse’s income, single parents must balance their children’s needs with their own retirement savings goals.

Single parents who have to say no to their children over and over again, struggle with wanting to say yes when money is tight and there’s no room in the budget for the latest fashions or games.  However, the last thing a single parent wants to do is convey a lack of financial discipline. A financial plan can help a single parent stay on track.

CNBC’s recent article, “Five financial essentials for single parents,” says that when single parents try to satisfy their kids, it can lead to a severe unintended consequence: placing their children ahead of their own retirement needs.

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