Articles Tagged with Guardianship

In a perfect world, a child would be raised by its parents. However, this isn’t always possible, and legally enforceable decisions must sometimes be made to name the person who is best positioned to look after a child.

Guardianship is generally only needed when a person is incapable—whether legally or practically—of looking after their own affairs, says VENTS Magazine in the article “Legal Guardianship 101: What You Need to Know.”

Courts have the power to appoint guardians for adults and children. This is usually a person who is unable to make decisions for themselves.

2.27.20It's never too early to start estate planning. If you already have a family, getting your personal affairs in order is a must. The sooner you start planning, the more prepared you will be for life's unexpected twists and turns.

Estate planning is a crucial process for everyone, no matter what assets you have now. If you want your family to be able to deal with your affairs, debts included, drafting an estate plan is critical, says Wealth Advisor’s recent article entitled “Estate planning for those 40 and under.”

If you have young children, or other dependents, planning is vitally important. The less you have, the more important your plan is, so it can provide as long as possible and in the best way for those most important to you. You can’t afford to make a mistake.

9.30.19It’s a hard thing to imagine: what would your life be like, if you were not able to take care of yourself? Not being able to manage your physical or financial needs, drive, leave your home without assistance, or do any of the things that you do now as a legally competent, abled-bodied person?

Being incapacitated means that someone has to be named to carry out your health care and manage your finances. Without a plan, courts usually get involved, and often people who don’t know the person needing help are the ones who make decisions for them. With a plan, as described in The Post-Searchlight’s recent article, “How to go about planning for incapacity,” you have the ability to tell what your wishes would be for health care and name someone to be in charge of your financial and legal affairs.

Incapacity can strike at any time. Advancing age can bring dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, and a serious illness or accident can happen suddenly. Therefore, it’s a real possibility that you or your spouse could become unable to handle your own medical or financial affairs.

12.11.19Once you understand what a will can do, the reason that everyone needs one becomes a lot clearer, especially if you have any minor children or any assets.

A will is a legal document used to provide clear and binding instructions on how you want your assets to be distributed after you die. Everyone should have a will, because they can also be used to identify a person who you want to handle your property, known as the executor and who should be the guardian of your minor children, if both parents die.

Yahoo Finance’s article, “What Does a Last Will and Testament Actually Do?” explains that a last will and testament has instructions for what you want to happen with your assets. A will also designates an executor, names beneficiaries and more. You should work with a qualified estate planning lawyer, when preparing one.

11.6.19Leaving the workplace behind and heading into retirement can be as much an emotional transition, as it is financial. The prospect of fulfilling dreams long deferred, while recognizing a milestone of aging can take time to work through. At the same time, there are time-sensitive tasks that need doing.

During this process, which is easier for some than others, it’s very important to tend to financial and legal matters in estate planning, reports Forbes in a recent article, “Retirement, Estate Planning: Documents You Should Have.”

Putting together a well thought out financial plan and creating an estate plan lets you be certain that personal, financial, and health wishes will be carried out the way you want. Managing your estate, regardless of the size, starts with working with an experienced estate planning attorney who will help give you greater control, privacy and security of your legacy. Here are the documents you need to get started:

11.4.19The durable power of attorney is a means of naming a person who can represent another in all legal and financial matters, while they are alive and well, as well as when they are incapacitated. It is a legal document that needs careful consideration.

The power of attorney gives a representative or an agent the legal right to conduct financial affairs for another individual. A healthcare power of attorney gives an agent the ability to make medical decisions for another person. Both can be crafted by an estate planning attorney to give complete and wide-ranging decision making powers, or to be more targeted.

The Aitken (SC) Standard’s recent article, “The durable power of attorney,” explains that there are three different types of powers of attorney: nondurable, springing and durable.

9.13.19“By the time Groucho was an old man, however, he experienced significant problems in his daily activities, medical decision-making and the management of his estate. He suffered from elements of dementia, a heart attack and congestive heart failure, falls resulting in a broken hip, and after that hip was repaired, another fall and broken hip, urinary tract infections, strokes and hypertension.”

Julius Henry Marx, better known as Groucho, died 42 years ago on Aug. 19, 1977, at age 86. Groucho teamed with three of his four brothers—Harpo, Chico, and Zeppo—to become stars of vaudeville, Broadway, film, radio and television. (A fifth brother, Gummo, wasn’t part of the act).

PBS News Hours’ recent article, “How Groucho Marx fell prey to elder abuse” reports that the legal battles over Groucho’s money and possessions went on long after he died. The unrest of his last few years is familiar to adult children concerned with the well-being of their elderly parents.

8.15.19“Until death do us part” sounds very different when you are in your twenties and getting married for the first time. As a couple travels through a life together, the time comes to create or revise an estate plan.

Granted, the estate planning process isn’t as much fun as planning a wedding but preparing for property distribution and planning for incapacity is a way to protect your spouse from having to deal with most preventable issues during a crisis. It can also prevent any number of unpleasant surprises.

Despite this, 17% of adults don’t think they need a will, believing that estate planning is only for the very wealthy. No matter how few assets it seems someone owns, completing a few documents can make a huge difference in the future.

8.5.19A will serves several purposes. It gives you the power to distribute your possessions, according to your own wishes. It also lets you name who should take care of your children, if they are minors when you die, and of your pets, if you provide for them in the will.

Just because your wealth isn’t measured in billions, doesn’t mean you don’t need a will. Without one, explains Yahoo Finance’s recent article, “Do You Really Need a Will?” you’ll have no say in what happens once you pass away. There may also be less for your heirs to inherit. There will also be more legal costs and stress.

Each state has laws that pertain to the distribution of a person's estate, if they die without a will. These laws most likely won’t mesh with your personal desires. If you don't have a will, ask yourself why you don't. Perhaps you think you don't need one. However, more than likely you do. If you're putting off starting this important estate planning task, here are some things to consider.

7.30.19When you die, the assets you’ve accumulated during your lifetime have to be distributed. If you don’t make a plan, your family may be left to clean up a legal mess, quarrel amongst themselves, or watch as a long-lost family member is given everything by a court decision.

An estate planning attorney helps clients, by making sure that the distribution of property after the person dies is done the way they wanted it done. While a plan may be simple or complicated, says the New Hampshire Union Leader in a recent article, “Estate planning is important and may require help from a professional,” working with an experienced estate planning attorney will save your family time, unnecessary costs and stress.

You definitely need to work with an attorney if your life falls into any of these categories:

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