Articles Posted in Alzheimer’s Disease

It can be difficult to face the mortality of a loved one. Unfortunately, when a loved one is diagnosed with a serious brain disease, family members do not have a choice. Diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and ALS bring families face to face with the reality of a family member’s condition. This makes it important to take action to secure their legacy and clarify their wishes. Putting together a Houston estate plan can accomplish this.

A recent article in Forbes discussed some estate planning considerations for people diagnosed with life-threatening neurological conditions. Below is some information family members can use to help a loved one in making sure their estate plan is complete.

Encourage Them To Review And Update Their Estate Plan: After creating an estate plan, people often forget to update it as circumstances change. Then life happens, and people find that the plan they put in place no longer suits their current situation. It is important to encourage loved ones to review and update their estate planning documents. If they have not previously put together an estate plan, now is the time to do it. Doing so will help ensure that their wishes are respected with regard to future medical care, as well as the distribution of their property upon their passing.

8.16.16We hope to enjoy out golden years, relaxing after decades of working and raising children. However, as we age, the likelihood of experiencing health issue increase. That includes Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

Learning that a loved one has Alzheimer’s or other diseases that require a great deal of health care is devastating to the individual and their families. The progressive nature of these diseases means that while the person doesn’t need intensive health care yet, eventually they will. According to an article from Newsmax, “5 Insurance Steps After Alzheimer's Strikes Loved One,” the planning for care needs to start immediately.

Alzheimer’s Disease International predicts that 44 million individuals worldwide have Alzheimer’s or a similar form of dementia, and 25% of those living with it never receive a diagnosis. Healthcare, including assisted living, memory care and in-home care is expensive. Health insurance is an important component of managing the ongoing expenses of living with Alzheimer’s.

7.26.19The progressive nature of dementia makes advance directives necessary to manage the health care needs of the patient.

When adult children suspect that one or both of their parents may be suffering from the early symptoms of dementia, it’s a good idea to sit down with an experienced elder care attorney to start planning for the legal issues that will follow, says The Roanoke Times in the article “What to do in absence of advance directive.” If the parent is unwilling to cooperate, the attorney will be able to refer the family to a social worker or other professional who may be able to assist. In addition, a geriatric evaluation consultation with a board-certified geriatrician will help to clarify the medical issues.

It’s wise for anyone older than 55 to have advance directives in place, should they become incapacitated so a trusted agent can fulfill the patient’s wishes in a dignified manner. Think ahead and plan ahead.

1.29.18A hearing of the Senate Special Committee on aging is looking at bipartisan legislation that would make changes to the Older Americans Act to give individuals younger than 60 with a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s a chance to access support programs.

Senate Bill 901, which is called “Younger-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Act” was introduced in late March by a number of Senators who crossed party lines to support the amendment to the Older Americans Act. According to McKnight’s Senior Living’s article, “Bill would aid those with younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease,” Senate Bill 901 was introduced by Senator Susan Collins (R-ME), chairman of the committee, Senator Bob Casey, ranking member and Senators Doug Jones (D-AL) and Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV). In the House of Representatives, the bill H.R. 1903 introduced was introduced by Representatives Kathleen Rice (D-NY), Pete King (R-NY), David Trone (D-MD), Elise Stefanik (R-NY), Maxine Waters (D-CA), and Chris Smith (R-NJ).

Nutritional programs, supportive services, transportation, legal services, elder-abuse prevention and caregiver support have been available through the OAA since 1965. However, under the current law, only individuals over 60 are eligible.

10.22.18A healthy life where you retain all your faculties and enjoy yourself, is definitely preferred to decades of dementia. We don’t get to choose, but we can plan.

As Baby Boomers continue to change the face of aging, and so many embrace the idea of genetic testing, many are confronted with a harsh picture of what their future may bring. If that includes dementia, there are facts you need to know and myths that need to be uncovered.

The (Bryan TX) Eagle’s recent article, “Alzheimer’s disease: Five common myths, busted,” reports that, according to the Alzheimer’s Association, one in three seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or another type of dementia. There are up to 5.7 million individuals who live and die with the disease, which makes it the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. The article provides five common myths about Alzheimer’s disease.

10.15.18Professionals who have had clients with family members suffering from dementia have a greater understanding of the challenges these families face. However, living through the experience personally is totally different.

When a loved one receives a diagnosis of dementia, as described in this deeply personal article from Financial Advisor, “The Limits of Financial and Estate Planning for Dementia,” the family has to begin immediately planning for the present and the future. It is a difficult journey. This story shares the family’s experience to help others.

The father was an extremely intelligent man, with a master’s degree in engineering and an MBA from a prestigious business school. When diagnosed with dementia, he and family members moved quickly to ensure that the correct documents were in place, working with a trusted estate planning attorney. The family’s plan worked well, as his father was able to be active for the early stages of the disease and never injured himself or anyone else.

10.1.18“H.4116 An Act Relative to Alzheimer’s And Related Dementias in The Commonwealth” is now law in Massachusetts, following an August 15 ceremony.

A ceremonial signing took place in Massachusetts Governor Baker’s office as community members, legislators and members of the administration gathered at the Alzheimer’s Association’s Waltham office, where the governor signed the new bill into law.

“Raising awareness about Alzheimer’s and dementia is key to supporting the Massachusetts families who are impacted by this horrible disease,” Governor Baker remarked in an article in the Framingham Source, “Governor Baker Signs Law Strengthening Alzheimer’s and Dementia Treatment in Massachusetts.”

Buzz-Aldrin-FFFEven when planning for competency issues is in place, there can still be problems. When a highly-intelligent public figure makes decisions his kids thinks are wrong, who is right?

The case of Buzz Aldrin, who is taking his son and daughter to court on charges of fraud, conspiracy and exploitation of the elderly, is a tough one. He’s accusing his adult children and his longtime manager of slandering him, by telling others he has dementia and Alzheimer’s diseases, using his money for their own gain and undermining romantic relationships.

The 88-year-old astronaut’s lawsuit illustrates the reason it's important for families to plan ahead for an aging parent. However, cases like Aldrin's can be hard, because it can be difficult to determine when someone has a deteriorating mental capacity, explains Good 4 Utah in the recent article, “Buzz Aldrin lawsuit shows need to plan for aging parents.”

5.18.18For younger patients, early-onset Alzheimer’s symptoms are usually disregarded or blamed on fatigue, depression or stress.

It often takes a very long time before a young person having problems with memory loss or confusion is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. The Concord Monitor reports, in “Stolen Memories: Problems with diagnosis of younger-onset Alzheimer’s, the delay in diagnosis can lead to problems with work and health insurance coverage.

One-third of the people with younger-onset Alzheimer’s, who responded to a 2006 survey by the Alzheimer’s Association said it took them somewhere between one to six years to receive an accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer’s. Subsequent studies by the Alzheimer’s Association have estimated that as many as 50% of people of all ages with the disease never receive a diagnosis.

2.8.17You might think that any doctor seeing patients over a certain age would automatically screen for Alzheimer’s or other dementia-related diseases, but until now that has not been the case.

Starting in January, Medicare will now begin reimbursing doctors for screening and providing information about care planning for patients with Alzheimer’s and other cognitive impairment diseases. What seems like common sense public health policy, took many years of advocacy from patient groups.

Santa Cruz Sentinel’s recent article, “Diagnosing Alzheimer’s: Medicare now pays doctors to stop and assess memory loss,” reports that more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s, and as many as 16 million will have the disease in 2050.  The cost of caring for those with the disease and other types of dementia is also skyrocketing. In the U.S., it’s estimated to total $236 billion in 2016 and is anticipated to increase to $1.1 trillion by 2050.

Contact Information