Articles Tagged with Gift Tax

11.9.19A fear that children will not be motivated to have careers because of their family’s wealth is a concern. However, in the long run, it can hamper how wealth is handled by the next generation.

In a perfect world, discussing a family’s legacy should be a process that begins when children are old enough to understand concepts as simple as giving and the notion that wealth comes with social responsibilities. In reality, few discuss their philanthropic or legacy goals with their children.

CNBC’s recent article, “Don’t expect Mom and Dad to clue you in on your inheritance,” says that 8 out of 10 financial advisors said that “some” or “hardly any” of their clients involve the next generation in family philanthropy, according to a recent survey from Key Private Bank.

5.22.19Some people give generously all year long, supporting local nonprofits and taking care of their family members. If that’s you, perhaps it’s time to consider taking a more strategic approach to lifetime giving.

Not everyone gives because they are looking to minimize their taxes. If you’ve reached the age and stage where you have accumulated more than enough wealth to retire on, you may enjoy being generous and seeing the impact your gifts can have on the lives of those you love, or those who are less fortunate.

WMUR’s recent article, Money Matters: Lifetime non-charitable giving,” explains that lifetime giving means you dictate who gets your property. Remember, if you die without a will, the intestacy laws of the state will dictate who gets what. With a will, you can decide how you want your property distributed after your death. However, it’s true that even with a will, you won’t really know how the property is distributed, because a beneficiary could disclaim an inheritance. With lifetime giving, you have more control over how your assets are distributed.

3.4.19The ING trust is used to generate tax savings in a number of ways. For the right person, they are a trend worth looking into. Are they right for you?

The expanded transfer tax exemptions created by the 2017 tax reform legislation will end in 2026. However, in the meantime, the increased exemptions have led many high-net worth individuals and couples to review their existing estate plans. The ING trust has now become a valuable tool and could easily become the biggest trend in 2019 estate planning.

Think Advisor’s recent article, “ING Trusts: The Hot Trend in HNW Estate Planning,” explains that because of the changes from the tax reform, ING trusts have taken on new significance. ING trusts can generate significant savings, both in income taxes and in overall transfer (gift, GST and estate) taxes. This means that it can be a good idea to look into an ING trust.

2.6.19While there’s a time limit on this great opportunity for tax-free giving—2025, unless Congress makes some changes—this is a good time to take advantage of minimizing your tax liability through generosity. There’s a new big break for top-dollar wealth transfers, thanks to the new tax law.

Basic rule: the more you give away, the smaller your estate and, therefore, the smaller your tax liability. If you’ve got a lot of wealth, this is a good time for you and those you want to make gifts to. The sooner you exploit this, the more you can give. It means that there’s less of a chance your estate will have to write a check to the IRS.

The Street’s recent article, “This Is the Golden Age of Tax-Free Gift Giving,” says the federal government has taxed estates since 1924, and as recently as 2001, the threshold when taxes kicked in was $675,000. This exemption level from taxation has been increased ever since. However, a large increase came from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which took effect in 2018. The Act doubled the exemption level and indexed it to inflation. Anything above the new limits is taxed at 40%. It is $11.4 million for singles and $22.8 million for married couples in 2019.

1.3.19Single with a net worth less than $11.4 million in 2019? You’re in luck—you can die knowing that all of your money will pass free of any federal estate tax to your heirs.

It was good news for the wealthy—the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) amped up the unified federal estate and gift tax exemption to $11.4 million for 2019 (and up to $11.18 million in 2018). If that wasn’t generous enough, those exemptions will be increased annually for inflation from 2020 to 2025. As comedian Mel Brooks would say, “It’s good to be the king.”

MarketWatch’s recent article, “How single folks should handle estate-tax planning under the new tax law,” explains that taxable estates above the exemption will have the excess taxed at a flat 40% rate. An individual’s cumulative lifetime taxable gifts in excess of the exemption are taxed at the 40% rate. Likewise, taxable gifts are those that are more than the annual federal gift tax exclusion of $15,000 for 2018 and 2019.

12.22.18An end-of-year decision from the IRS about the new tax law and gifting has given people with generous spirits and hefty bank accounts reasons to be cheerful about gifting.

Increases to basic estate and gift tax exemptions were welcome by many, when the new tax law details were unveiled. However, questions were raised: how long will those exemptions be in place? What happens when they expire?

The changes increased the exemption to $10 million per person from $5 million. When you account for inflation adjustments, that exemption is currently at $11,180,000 for 2018, increasing to $11,400,000 for 2019.

1.22.18First, say thank you. Then, learn more about the rules about paying taxes on a financial gift.

Couples whose families are generous enough to give them help towards buying their first home are often concerned with what, if any, tax liability may be created. Do they have to pay taxes on the gift? Do their parents or in-laws pay taxes?

The tax laws on gifts can be pretty confusing, says nj.com in an article, “Are taxes owed on gift from in-laws?”

11.15.17It may sound whimsical, but the moment you open a business is also the time to start thinking about how you’ll exit the business, whether you intend to sell to a partner, leave the entire business to a family member or sell as soon as you come up with the next big idea.

One of the biggest mistakes made by entrepreneurs is failing to create a written plan for their long-term exit strategy. What they don’t understand is that by creating a succession plan, which includes ways to boost the value of the business years before you want to sell or retire, they’ll have a created a road map for a more successful business.

Springfield (MO) Business Journal’s recent article, “Starting a business? Plan your exit now,” advises that you begin with creating a culture of success with your employees, especially the key people. That means fostering an ownership mentality, so they see their critical role in the company’s long-term success and their role in helping that to continue in the future, long and short term.

7.19.17If you plan on leaving the family home to your heirs when you die, be aware of the tax liabilities that are associated with inheriting a house.

This is the type of estate planning decision that requires a closer look with an estate planning attorney to evaluate the pros and cons, as well as the short and long-term consequences. First, you’ll need to know the value of the house, which will be based on its fair market value on the date of the owner’s death, according to a recent article from NJ.com, “Complex inheritance taxes on a home.”

If you have a home valued at over $1 million, it may sell for close to that amount. Let’s say that you’re single and are 80 years old. You live with your widowed sister. Your will instructs that your sister should have life ownership when you pass and then it is left in trust for nieces and nephews. What would their tax bill be?

6.21.17Unintended consequences can occur when dividing up real property, which is often harder to distribute than investment accounts or savings accounts. Planning for real property division must take into account the different circumstances of your heirs.

You may have envisioned a time in the future, when your children and grandchildren enjoy the same lakeside home as you have for years after you’re gone, and are pleased with the idea of leaving the family vacation home to the next generation. But think again, says a recent article in Financial Planning, “Save clients from tax pitfalls, family strife when passing on that lake cabin,” because your vision may not translate into reality.

Some of the kids may be attached to the family vacation home and want to keep it. If possible, the best solution is a buyout among the siblings. That’s not as simple if finances don’t allow it, and the sentimental siblings are forced to sell, resulting in hard feelings. Another option is to put the vacation home in an irrevocable trust to remove it from the estate.

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